Primary Tweeters to follow in 2014

I’ve watched the #nurture1314 hashtag go from strength to strength, but it’s not really my sort of thing. However, as my end-of-year-review, I’m finally getting round to following up on @Samfr‘s excellent post on 75 education people you should follow. It was quickly noted when it was published back in early November that there were very few (if any) primary tweeters listed. That wasn’t because of some bias of Sam’s but rather because of the differences between his interests and those of most primary tweeters. I strongly recommend Sam’s list as a starting point for anyone new to Twitter in education.

I’m not going to attempt anything like a list of 75*, and just like Sam’s list, mine will be wholly subjective based on what has interested me during 2013. There are hundreds, perhaps thousands, more primary teachers who also use Twitter, but these are the people who have sparked my interest over the last year and whom I recommend to you for 2014 if you’re not already following them. Many also have excellent blogs well worth looking out for. Of course, you should also be following me!

*I had to stop myself at 25, mind!

Primary Blogger – an account set up not long after my plea for more primary bloggers. It re-blogs and then tweets blogs which are primary-linked, and so is an excellent starting point.

Prawnseye – a new twitter account promoting things of interest to primary – may be one to watch in 2014?

Senior Leaders

Alison Peacock – newly damed (who knew that was a word?), headteacher of Wroxham Teaching School (Also tweets as network leader for Cambridge Primary Review @CPRnet)

The Primary Head – a primary head in Bristol, with a great sense of humour as seen in his blog.

Old Primary Head – another Bristol Head – something of a double-act with The Primary Head!

Chris Andrew – a primary deputy who has also begun to tackle Ofsted from the inside!

Bekblayton – another London-based deputy, and creator of Digital Classrooms

Stephen Lockyer – deputy in South East, proud proponent of #goprimary hashtag!

Tracey Griffiths – primary deputy and ‘Future Leader’ from London

Phil Allman – Junior School Head, not afraid of sharing his views.

Betsy Salt & Manwithadog – another pair of primary headteachers in Bristol (what’s with them down there?)

Classroom Teachers

Claire Lotriet – Y6 teacher in London, with plenty of good ideas to share.

Miss Horsfall – brilliantly self-described as “Year 3 wrangler-in-chief”, also in London

Miss Smith – Another London teacher, not afraid to have her say.

Emma Hardy – Infant teacher (god bless ’em all!) and Labour activist, as well as co-organiser of Northern Rocks

Mr Chadwick – Y6 teacher & maths leader in the Westcountry.

Jo Payne – Y4 teacher, organiser of Teachmeet Sussex, and avid Pinterest user.

Amy Harvey – Y6 teacher and curriculum leader

Classroom Truths – soon quick to put me in my place following my call for primary blogs, but adding plenty to the debate too.

The Erasmus Collective – not as odd as the title suggests: infant teacher and mum in East Anglia.

Nancy Gedge – writes particularly on matters affecting SEN

Cherryl KD – another SEN expert who teaches across phases (and who has recently kindly added a hyphen for clarity)

Others with Primary involvement
I should say that many of these are also classroom practitioners either by training, experience, or on-going classroom work, but are perhaps more primarily involved now in other linked fields.

Tim Taylor – Creator of Imaginative Inquiry, teacher, and writer.

Sue Cowley – famed for her teaching books, with a particular interest in Early Years.

Andy Jolley – primary governor, with a close eye on the impending free meals for infants fiasco!

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15 thoughts on “Primary Tweeters to follow in 2014

  1. teachingbattleground 31 December 2013 at 5:24 pm Reply

    Reblogged this on The Echo Chamber.

  2. nancy 31 December 2013 at 5:29 pm Reply

    I’d better get following! Thanks for the mention, and thanks for the list. I need I link up with more primary people – I think we have a distinctive ‘something’ to add.

  3. Tim Taylor 31 December 2013 at 6:20 pm Reply

    Reblogged this on Primary Blogging.

  4. Julia Skinner (@theheadsoffice) 31 December 2013 at 6:47 pm Reply

    Great list. A pendantic point – they are bloggers rather than tweeters although some of them tweet!😉

    • Michael Tidd 1 January 2014 at 1:14 am Reply

      Thanks Julia. They are all tweeters (the links are to their Twitter profiles), but it’s definitely the case that I’ve recommended many who blog too. I suspect that’s part of their appeal.

  5. mrsmiggins123 1 January 2014 at 11:04 am Reply

    Thanks Michael! Having started to blog in last 2 weeks I will definitely be blogging more in 2014 – thinking of my first topic. HNY!

  6. Soaring into 2014 | Reach For The Moon 3 January 2014 at 5:15 pm Reply

    […] to her; @michaelt1979 recommending me on his ‘Who to follow in 2014′ blog post:https://michaelt1979.wordpress.com/2013/12/31/primary-tweeters-to-follow-in-2014/ made my wings flap and the response to that with an extra 50 follows on Twitter made me […]

  7. classroomtruths 4 January 2014 at 5:57 pm Reply

    I’m following all of these chaps and chapettes now, good work Sir!

  8. […] The Primary Tweeters to follow in 2014 and a list of the best Primary Blogs: http://primaryblogger1.wordpress.com/  via @michaelt1979 […]

  9. Why Blog? [JAS] | RGS Learning 7 April 2014 at 2:46 pm Reply

    […] good place to start: The Primary Tweeters to follow in 2014 and a list of the best Primary Blogs –  http://primaryblogger1.wordpress.com/  via […]

  10. […] Primary Tweeters to follow in 2014 […]

  11. mrkmurphy 9 August 2014 at 10:39 pm Reply

    A brilliant list!!! Thanks!🙂

  12. mrkmurphy 9 August 2014 at 10:41 pm Reply

    Reblogged this on A Teaching Adventure! and commented:
    A very helpful list for primary teachers who are newer members of the twitterati. Get following!🙂

  13. […] year I wrote a post entitled Primary Tweeters to follow in 2014. They are still good recommendations, but a year is a long time on Twitter – and blogs. […]

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