Y2 and Y6 tests: data collections

Last month I started collecting data from schools who had used the Y6 sample tests to try to gather some useful information that we could all share. That project has been wildly successful, such that I have extended it several times. So, firstly let me provide the links for the forms where I’m collecting data from schools – please do share any data you have collected over the last term about your pupils by visiting these documents:

So, what have I found so far? Here is some summary information for key areas:

Key Stage 1 DfE Sample tests

Subject Mean Average Score Median Score Interquartile range
Reading 20 marks 22 marks 12 – 29 marks
Grammar, Punctuation & Spelling 18 marks 17 marks 10 – 26 marks
Mathematics 29 marks 29 marks 19 – 39 marks

More detail is available on this previous post. You can access a spreadsheet to present your own school’s results in a comparison table and graphs alongside the national data collected so far. Access the comparison spreadsheet here: Key Stage 1 Comparisons

Key Stage 2 DfE Sample tests

Subject Mean Average Score Median Score Interquartile range
Reading 29 marks 30 marks 23 – 36 marks
Grammar, Punctuation & Spelling 35 marks 35 marks 26 – 44 marks
Mathematics 59 marks 59 marks 39 – 79 marks

More detail is available on this previous post. You can access a spreadsheet to present your own school’s results in a comparison table and graphs alongside the national data collected so far. Access the comparison spreadsheet here: Key Stage 2 Comparisons

Key Stage 2 Writing Assessments

I did try to collect KS2 assessment data, but the results seem wildly doubtful in places. Nevertheless, I present some detail here:

  • Median %age working at expected level or above: 68%
  • Sample %age working at expected level or above: 66%
  • Sample %age working at greater depth: 12%

More details on the Writing data can be found at this blog post.

Further data

I am continuing to collect data from sample tests, and also for the Optional Tests produced by Rising Stars, so please do share your school’s data (completely anonymously) via the spreadsheet links below:

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8 thoughts on “Y2 and Y6 tests: data collections

  1. cazzypot2013 27 March 2016 at 12:47 pm Reply

    Reblogged this on The Echo Chamber.

  2. Richard 10 April 2016 at 2:34 pm Reply

    The data above, could you let me know the number of pupils in each subject that were sampled? Thank you.

    • Michael Tidd 10 April 2016 at 2:51 pm Reply

      If you have a look at the linked blogs, they have numbers on them

  3. Gillian Jenkins 10 April 2016 at 6:20 pm Reply

    Thank you so much for this. Could you confirm that the median and mean scores for KS2 SPAG test is the combined spelling and grammar test score out of 70? Or is it just score for grammar paper out of 50?

    • Michael Tidd 10 April 2016 at 6:22 pm Reply

      That is based on the combined score out of 70.

  4. Wing Commander Silverfox 20 April 2016 at 8:37 am Reply

    Recently used this with my Year 6 staff and our triad of schools who work in partnership. Really useful! Question: am I being dumb in thinking that, for example, if the average score for GPS is 35.40 then 35 would be the ‘100’ standardised? Wouldn’t this mean that potentially (as in teh wont of averages) arounf 50-60% of the nation will be below standardised? Possibly my A-Level statistics needs revision!

    • Michael Tidd 20 April 2016 at 8:50 am Reply

      Hello – that’s a common misunderstanding of the Scaled score thing. They are scaled, but not standardised.
      The thresholds will be set in the same way as in the past: looking at the content of the paper, comparing it to the expected performance descriptor (i.e. list of things that a child working at expected standard should be able to do) and then working out what that looks like in terms of marks. The decision is made by a panel at STA (that includes teachers!)
      That’s different from standardised scores which work much more on the averages idea you mention.

      • Wing Commander Silverfox 20 April 2016 at 9:04 am Reply

        Ah! Many thanks. I’m looking at these scores and was ready to cry into my tea!

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